HIIT for intermediate

In the first part of the article I discussed basic training protocols and the way of including intervals in your training plan. You reach the intermediate stage when you are able to run for 45 minutes at the pace higher than 5 minutes per each kilometre (>12 kph) with not much effort, or you can do over 10 intervals VO2 max 15/30 (15 seconds of sprint, 30 seconds of rest) in a session. If you have got problems with constant run, you shouldn't try VO2 max intervals which serve upswing of your maximal oxygen uptake. It means that your heart and circulatory system must do too heavy work during intervals (heart rate over 85% of maximal heart rate; more than 70% of VO2 max.), too much of lactic acid will be produced, and you will break down.

You should definitely read:

HIIT FOR BEGINNERS

You should build an oxygen base by running at a moderate pace a few times a week (2-4 times a week – heart rate below 75% of your maximal rate, 35-70% of VO2 max.). What may be a determinant of your efficiency is the pace you achieve in the following intervals. If you use a training monitoring application (for example one fitted with GPS system), you will immediately notice that first 3-4 intervals are done at a right speed but at the next your maximal speed is slower. If the drop of speed is large (inability to continue the work at a given intensity), you must extend time of rest between following intervals (5-10 second can make a big difference) or reduce their number.

Stepped method – how to build maximal oxygen uptake (HIIT)

This method involves graduation of effort intensity. Such a training can have the following structure:

General static warm-up,

Start-up: run for 5-7 minutes (smooth running, moderate heart rate),

3-5 intervals: 15 seconds of speed-up (fast run or sprint), 45 seconds of rest (ie. jogging),

3-5 intervals: 15 seconds of speed-up, 30 seconds of rest,

3-5 intervals: 15 seconds of speed-up, 15 seconds of rest,

Run at a constant rata for 15-20 minutes,

Cool-down,

Stretching.

This method allows to graduate effort, and is especially recommended when you need to determine your actual efficiency. Your first 15/45 intervals will tell you how much you can afford. If problems with keeping up the pace appears already at the stage where you take 45 seconds to rest, you should get back to building your oxygen base (constant pace running for a couple of weeks). If you can do 5 x 15/45 intervals without much effort, move on to the harder version, that is next step: shorten the rest part by 15 seconds. The rule is the same: if you have any problems keeping up the pace during the 15/30 intervals, don't shorten the rest break.

How to include the HIIT training in your weekly training plan?

Schedule – 4 running trainings, including 1 x rhythms, 2 x intervals, 1 x smooth run:

Monday: Run at a constant (comfortable) pace for 35-45 minutes

Tuesday: Rhythms – 10 x 1 minute of work + rest (to complete regeneration) + moderate run for 15-20 minutes

Wednesday: VO2 max. interval session  - 10 x 15/30 intervals + moderate run (the whole session lasts for 25-30 minutes)

Thursday: NO TRAINING

Friday: VO2 max. interval session - 15 x stepped method intervals + moderate run (the whole session lasts for 25-30 minutes)

Saturday/Sunday - NO TRAINING

Differential intervals done within strength sessions and running intervals:

Monday: HIIRT training for 15-20 minutes + cool-down and lower-intensity training for 10-15 minutes

Tuesday: Smooth run for 35-45 minutes

Wednesday: VO2 max. interval session  - 10 x 15/30 intervals + moderate run (the whole session lases for 25-30 minutes)

Thursday: NO TRAINING

Friday: HIIRT training for 15-20 minutes + cool-down and lower-intensity training for 10-15 minutes

Saturday/Sunday - NO TRAINING

Note: the HIIRT training (high-intensity interval resistance training) is for example: a moderate training session which allows you to do the suggested number of repetitions within 15-20 minutes.

Possible sets of interval exercises within HIIRT:

  • 6 x thrusters + 6 x pull ups + 6 x dips + 6 x sprawls, 1 minute of a break.
  • 6 x power clean + 6 x dead lift + 6 x renegade row (on each hand) + 6 x sprawls.
  • 6 pushups with clapping + 10 metres run alternately (15 seconds) + 6 squats (hands straight, in front of you)
  • Sprawls for 30 seconds + knees-to-chest spikes: 30 seconds + A skip: 30 seconds + Spiderman push ups: 30 secons
  • Alternately run with load (ie. a bag of sand or a partner on your shoulder): 30 m +  sprint with no load, and back again: for 1 minute, then 1 minute of a rest
  • Ladder climbing, knees-to-chest spikes, jumping over obstacles,
  • Power clean + front squat + push press + back squat + push press – 3-5 repetitions of each exercise.

Similar interval mix can be made of all types of exercises that engage big parts of muscles (back and legs). What is not recommended is gym equipment and isolation exercises. A good proportion is when workout time equals rest time. Those who are well-trained can shorten their sessions, for example: 2 minutes of work, 90 seconds of rest.

A YOUTUBE film on how to make exemplary exercises of a given circuit:

Classical strength training (2 x) + interval sessions (2 x) with loads:

Monday: strength training: 60-70 minutes (session A)

Tuesday: HIIRT for 15-20 minutes + cool-down and lower-intensity training for 10-15 minutes

Wednesday: NO TRAINING

Thursday: strength training: 60-70 minutes (session B)

Friday: HIIRT for 15-20 minutes + cool-down and training

Saturday: NO TRAINING

Sunday: NO TRAINING

A PUSH PULL strength training (4 x) + interval sessions (1 x):

Monday: strength training: 60-70 minutes (sesion A; ie. push)

Tuesday: strength training: 60-70 minutes (sesion B; ie. pull)

Wednesday: NO TRAINING

Thursday: VO2 max interval session (HIIT): 10 x 15/30 intervals + smooth run (the whole session lasts for 25-30 minutes) OR HIIRT

Friday: strength training: 60-70 minutes (sesion A; ie. push)

Saturday: strength training: 60-70 minutes (sesion B; ie. pull)

Sunday: NO TRAINING

Running (HIIT) / HIIRT + strength training PPL (push, pull, legs):

Monday: strength training for 60-70 minutes (session A; ie. push)

Tuesday: strength training for 60-70 minutes (session B; ir. pull)

Wednesday: NO TRAINING

Thursday: strength training for 60-70 minutes (session C „LEGS”)

Friday: NO TRAINING

Saturday: VO2 max interval session (HIIT): 10 x 15/30 intervals + smooth run (The whole session lases for 25-30 minutes) OR HIIRT training

Sunday: NO TRAINING

Running (HIIT) / HIIRT + mixed strength training (push, pull, FBW):

Monday: strength training for 60-70 minutes (session A; ie. push)

Tuesday: strength training for 60-70 minutes (session B; ie. pull)

Wednesday: NO TRAINING

Thursday: strength training for 60-70 minutes (session C „FBW” – full body workout on the session)

Friday: NO TRAINING

Saturday: VO2 max interval session (HIIT): 10 x 15/30 intervals + smooth run (the whole session lasts for 25-30 minutes) OR HIIRT training

Sunday: moderate run for 30-40 minutes

Interval running, HIIRT and martial arts (Brasilian jujitsu / wrestling / MMA):

Monday: in the morning: metabolic training (15-20 minutes) or HIIT; BJJ in the evening

Tuesday: BJJ in the evening

Wednesday: IN THE MORNING: VO2 max interval session (HIIT): 10 x 15/30 interval session + smooth run (the whole session lasts for 25-30 minutes) OR HIIRT training; IN THE EVENING: BJJ/MMA

Thursday: NO TRAINING

Friday: In the morning: running training for 25-35 minutes. In the evening: box/Thai box.

Saturday: NO TRAINING

Sunday: NO TRAINING

Interval running, HIIRT and martial arts (Thai box, box):

Monday: in the morning: metabolic training (15-20 minutes) or HIIT; Thai box in the evening

Tuesday: box in the evening

Wednesday: IN THE MORNING: strength training (A); IN THE EVENING: Thai box

Thursday: NO TRAINING or box

Friday: IN THE MORNING: strength training (B); IN THE EVENING: Thai box

Saturday: Smooth run for 20 minutes + HIIT session

Sunday: NO TRAINING

Can I do 2 interval trainings a day?

Every martial arts training and strength training are intervals of irregular structure. So, yes, you can, but prepare yourself for decline in performance during the second training on the same day. Quick restoration of glycogen is essential (supply of carbohydrates after you finish your first training, for example: fruits or instant carbohydrates). I want to stress it, though, that not every person will be able to train this way. Surely, there is no point doing 2 HIIT/HIIRT sessions the same day.

Can I run twice a day?

Yes, you can, but this way you will reduce effectiveness of your running training. You can also suffer injury. Leave similar combinations to professionals.

Can I do smooth running training in the morning and interval training in the evening?

Yes, you can. But remember to limit the capacity and intensity of the evening training (the risk of injury and overtraining). Instead of running twice a day, I recommend interval training with loads.

Can I run in the morning and do a strength training in the evening?

Yes, you can, but you should match your trainings properly, for example you can reduce your distance, pace or number of repetitions in the strength training. It is not advisable to do the intervas in the morning (the highest cortisol level, smaller amounts of glycogen), and it is forbidden to do this training on an empty stomach.

Can I run on no-training days?

If you don't make sure that your body gets enough time to regenerate, you can expose yourself to a threat of a concussion (no matter if you train on no-training days, if you run, do martial arts or strength training). You should give your body minimum 2 days of rest. You can try to experiment after months and months of training but t least in the beginning you should be be reasonable.

Can I do intervals after a strength training?

Yes, in some cases, for example when you have no time for an separate interval training. Do not try to do running intervals after a strength training; you won't be able to achieve adequate pace. You can try HIIRT intervals, but usually the intensity of such a training is insufficient.

To sum up: it is a solution for highly trained sportsmen with many years of practice (for example ones professionally engaged in crossfit, running, swimming etc.).

Can I do intervals before a strength training?

After suitably intensive interval running (HIIT) or interval strength training (HIIRT) you will be unable to do a strength training. If you are, though, it means your training is not intensive enough (too long rest breaks, too little weight - HIIRT sessions).

Should I secure my muscles from catabolism (BCAA, carbohydrates)?

If you eat a balanced diet, such fears are groundless. Unless you train twice a day, there is no need to protect your muscles from muscle tissue loss. You may, but you don't have to, supplement amino acids before and during the interval training, and carbohydrates and proteins after one.

Recommended dosage:

During your training: 1-2 gs of BCAA on every 10 kgs of body mass during the interval or strength training (ie. you weigh 100 kgs = you are taking 10-20 g of BCAA; an 80 kgs person is taking 8-16 g of BCAA etc.);

After the training: 0.4-0.6 g of carbohydrates + 0.3 g of proteins per each kilogram of body mass (so you weigh 100 kgs = you are taking 40-60 g of carbohydrates + 30 g of proteins).

Sources: 1. “Interval training helps elite athletes get fitter without overtraining” http://www.ergo-log.com/interval-training-helps-elite-athletes-get-fitter-without-overtraining.html 2. „Patofizjologia człowieka w zarysie” J. Guzek 3. „Współczesny trening siły mięśniowej” wyd II, Adam Zając, Michał Wilk, Stanisław Poprzęcki, Bogdan Bacik, Remigiusz Rzepka, Kazimierz Mikołajec, Karina Nowak Katowice 2010 4. „Fizjologia człowieka z elementami fizjologii stosowanej i klinicznej”. Władysław Z. Traczyk, Andrzej Trzebski; Wydawnictwo Lekarskie Pzwl 2004 5. „Fizjologiczne podstawy wysiłku fizycznego”, J. Górski Wydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWL 6. “High-Intensity Interval Resistance Training (HIRT) influences resting energy expenditure and respiratory ratio in non-dieting individuals”. J Transl Med. 2012 Nov 24;10:237. doi: 10.1186/1479-5876-10-237. Department of Biomedical Sciences, Physiological Laboratory, University of Padova, via Marzolo 3, Padova 35131, Italy. 7. http://www.charlespoliquin.com/Blog/tabid/130/EntryId/1944/Tip-557-Lose-Fat-With-High-Intensity-Resistance-Training.aspx#sthash.XPAuKBHw.dpuf 8. http://anabolicminds.com/forum/content/hiit-fat-loss-3045/ 9. “The effects of high-intensity intermittent exercise training on fat loss and fasting insulin levels of young women. “ Trapp EG, Chisholm DJ, Freund J, Boutcher SH. International Journal of Obesity. 2008;32(4):684–691. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18197184 10. “The Effect of High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise on Body Composition of Overweight Young Males” J Obes. 2012; 2012: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3375095/#B8 11. http://www.ergo-log.com/interval-training-helps-the-obese-lose-weight.html 12. http://potreningu.pl/artykuly/1017/mity-dotyczace-hiit-oraz-innych-form-treningu-interwalowego